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UW-RF students from left to right: Jake Starkey, Courtney Parson and Joe Hanson made their presentation on the need for a juvenile outpatient treatment program in Pierce County Wednesday to the Pierce County Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. 
-- Photo submitted
UW-RF students from left to right: Jake Starkey, Courtney Parson and Joe Hanson made their presentation on the need for a juvenile outpatient treatment program in Pierce County Wednesday to the Pierce County Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. -- Photo submitted

Council hears benefits of outpatient program

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news Ellsworth, 54011

Ellsworth Wisconsin 126 S. Chestnut St. 54011

The Pierce County Criminal Justice Coordinating Council (PCCJCC) heard a presentation Wednesday about the feasibility of a juvenile outpatient treatment program.

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The presentation was put on by University of Wisconsin-River Falls seniors Courtney Parson, Jake Starkey and Joe Hanson as part of a semester-long project they are undertaking in an Experiential Learning class taught by UW-RF Agricultural Economic professor Juliet Tomkins.

PCCJCC coordinator Linda Flanders explained the class, which is for students who are pursing an Agricultural degree, deals with business, marketing and feasibility plans. Flanders and Child, Youth and Families Manager Julie Krings made the proposal to Tomkins about looking into a juvenile outpatient program and she agreed.

"(Tomkins) felt this had merit and it was something they had never done before," Flanders said. She added, Krings and her, along with a mentor assisted them, but the three did all the research.

And, as they began their presentation, the rationale for studying one was quickly made known.

"Pierce County currently doesn't have any outpatient treatment programs to offer to juveniles." Parson said. The three went on to state mental health, substance abuse and domestic abuse needs should be addressed in these programs, which, as a result, would lead to an improved criminal justice system.

For more please read the May 1 print version of the Herald.

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