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CRIME AND COURT ROUNDUP: Former Abbotsford teacher accused of having sex with two students

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news Ellsworth, 54011
Ellsworth Wisconsin 126 S. Chestnut St. 54011

A former central Wisconsin school teacher has been ordered to stand trial for having sex with two students, and contacting one of them after he was charged.  A judge in Clark County found enough evidence yesterday to put 25-year-old Andy Follen on trial.  The former Abbotsford High School math instructor is scheduled to enter pleas July 2nd to five felony counts of sexual assault by a school staffer -- plus three additional charges filed a month later.  Authorities said Follen had sexual relationships with two 17-year-old female students last October, and one was a volleyball player.  After the initial counts were handed down, prosecutors said Follen claimed to be with an Eau Claire softball team when he got one of his victims to set up an instant messaging account, where he urged the girl to call the D-A and ask that his charges be reduced.  That resulted in a new charge of intimidating a victim, plus two bail jumping counts.  Follen resigned from Abbotsford in January, while the case was being investigated.

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A three-day trial is set to begin September 15th in a civil suit filed by a U-W Whitewater professor, who said a student took cheap shots at her on a Web site that rates college instructors.  Communications professor Sally Vogl-Bauer claims that Anthony Llewellyn defamed her character, when he posted accusatory videos and comments on a professor-rating site.  Llewellen told the Janesville Gazette he spoke with Vogl-Bauer in April about various concerns, two months before he was told he flunked her class.  His online comments accused the instructor of criticizing his academic abilities, giving him an unfair grade, and causing him to drop out of school.  Llewellen said he was simply using the Web site's opportunity to alert other potential students to his experience.  Vogl-Bauer's lawyer said the comments could be especially damaging to a person in a smaller town, where the university is by far the main employer.  The suit seeks punitive damages, plus the professor's legal costs.  A hearing on pre-trial requests is set for June 23rd in Walworth County.

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Milwaukee Police now say they've identified one of two men engaged in a shoot-out in which a ten-year-old girl was critically wounded in the crossfire.  No arrests were made as of last evening.  Sierra Guyton was still in critical condition at last word at Children's Hospital after being shot in the head.  Her family said she was on life support and brain-dead -- but treatment continued, and her father was still hoping she could make it through.  She was playing close to the monkey bars at the Clarke Street Elementary School on Milwaukee's north side when she was struck early Wednesday evening.  Alderman Russell Stamper visited Guyton's family home yesterday, urging residents to start block clubs and neighborhood watch groups.  It was still light when the shootings occurred.  A couple of neighborhood residents said it become normal for people to brandish guns in broad daylight.  Some begged for structure to return to what's considered one of Milwaukee's poorest areas.

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Wisconsin's political donors no longer have a limit on the total amount they can give candidates each year.  Federal Judge Lynn Adelman yesterday signed an agreement to stop enforcing Wisconsin's ten-thousand-dollar aggregate cap on political donations by one person.  It was first announced a couple of weeks ago that the Badger State would no longer enforce its limit.  That was after the U-S Supreme Court struck down a total annual cap on how much donors can give to congressional candidates and political action committees each year.  The Wisconsin settlement also ended a lawsuit from Fred Young of Racine, which challenged the state's aggregate limit.  Donors still have limits on what they can give to individual candidates.  

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Wisconsin's political donors no longer have a limit on the total amount they can give candidates each year.  Federal Judge Lynn Adelman yesterday signed an agreement to stop enforcing Wisconsin's ten-thousand-dollar aggregate cap on political donations by one person.  It was first announced a couple of weeks ago that the Badger State would no longer enforce its limit.  That was after the U-S Supreme Court struck down a total annual cap on how much donors can give to congressional candidates and political action committees each year.  The Wisconsin settlement also ended a lawsuit from Fred Young of Racine, which challenged the state's aggregate limit.  Donors still have limits on what they can give to individual candidates.  

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Kenosha Police continue to investigate the shooting death of a man outside the city's Shalom Center.  Officials said it could have been an accident, but they don't know for sure.  Thirty-three Kavin Stewart died Wednesday night, after he was shot once in a leg several hours earlier.  When police arrived at the shooting scene, Stewart was already gone.  He reportedly tried driving himself to a hospital.  Milwaukee Police now say they've identified one of two men engaged in a shoot-out in which a ten-year-old girl was critically wounded in the crossfire.  No arrests were made as of last evening.  

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Environmental groups have filed suit to stop the Army Corps of Engineers from building more man-made structures to preserve navigation on the Mississippi River.  The National Wildlife Federation is among the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed yesterday in a federal court in East Saint Louis.  The Army Corps has long relied on wing dikes, bend-way weirs, and chevrons to keep places of heavy sediment clear.  Those things reduce the need for expensive dredging in the Mississippi.  The plaintiffs say the structures actually provoke flooding -- and four large floods over the past two decades prove it.  The plaintiffs want the Corps to stop using the man-made devices until their full environmental impacts are determined.  The Army Corps says it stands behind its work.

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