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CRIME AND COURT ROUNDUP: UW-Madison police sent 10 drinkers to detox centers relating to Wisconsin's Final Four game

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Ellsworth Wisconsin 126 S. Chestnut St. 54011

MADISON -- U-W Madison Police sent ten drinkers to detox centers and cited 13 others for drinking underage, at bars and parties for the Badgers' Final Four basketball game.  Spokesman Marc Lovicott said it was worst weekend of the school year for alcohol issues, on a campus with a national reputation as one of the best party schools.  Seven of those taken to detox were U-W students.  Two were shipped off before the start of the Wisconsin-Kentucky game just after eight on Saturday night.  A 21-year-old Madison student was found unconscious in a restroom at a campus cafeteria with a blood alcohol content of point-37 -- which experts said was a near-fatal level.  It was about four-and-a-half times the minimum threshold for drunk drivers.  One person who was not connected with the U-W was arrested for O-W-I.  However, the crowds spilling onto Madison's State Street were subdued after the Badgers lost to Kentucky by one point in the game's final seconds.

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A prosecutor who's running for state attorney general is giving a break to certain minority members convicted of child abuse for spanking their kids.  The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports today on a plan for deferred prosecution agreements outlined in January by Dane County D-A Ismael Ozanne.  He's one of three Democrats hoping to replace J-B Van Hollen, who will step down at the end of the year.  Deferred prosecutions are granted in a variety of criminal cases in which defendants plead guilty or no contest, and their convictions are dropped or reduced if they meet various conditions over a designated period of time.  In cases of spanking abuse, Ozanne offers deferred prosecutions in Dane County if minority defendants use corporal punishment as a quote, "culturally acceptable form of discipline."  Ozanne said 54-percent of child abuse cases in Dane County in 2011-and-'12 involved minorities, even though they make up just 15-percent of the population.  He said he developed the program to address that disparity. Ozanne's attorney general campaign says it's a mistake to assume that the program goes soft on anyone -- and its goal is to protect children.

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The defense is starting to make its case today in the trial of a man arrested in Madison for killing a woman in South Dakota, as part of a plot to assassinate the president.  43-year-old James McVay has pleaded guilty but insane to killing 75-year-old Maybelle Schein in 2011, stealing her car, and driving to Washington to kill President Obama.  He never made it to D-C, after being arrested in Madison following a brief police chase.  That's where he spelled out his assassination plot to police and a T-V reporter.  Jurors must decide whether McVay will get the death penalty by lethal injection, or life in prison.

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A Madison area man struck a plea deal, just before he was about to stand trial for killing his two-year-old son with an S-U-V and stabbing his mother.  32-year-old Jesus Castillo-Dimas pleaded no contest yesterday to Dane County charges of reckless homicide and attempted homicide.  Another count of reckless homicide was reduced to reckless endangerment, and Castillo-Dimas pleaded no contest to that.  The plea deal let him escape a possible life prison sentence.  The defense has agreed to at least a 30-year prison term, and prosecutors can ask for more.  Castillo-Dimas will be sentenced June 12th.  Authorities said he ran over his two-year-old son Yandel Castillo-Castillo in Fitchburg in the summer of 2012.  Officials said he also tried killing the boy's mother and her boyfriend during the incident.  Prosecutors said Castillo-Dimas laughed at his ex-girlfriend and then taunted her, saying neither she nor him would have custody of the child.

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A body found in a cornfield in Jefferson County has been identified as a missing Milwaukee woman.  Sheriff's deputies said 23-year-old Alejandra Guzman-Flores was last seen by her family last October fifth.  A motorist found her body March 29th near a road in the town of Ixonia.  Other details have not been released.

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Testimony begins this morning in the trial of Mark Bucki, the Merrill area man accused of killing his estranged wife and dumping her remains.  Both sides spent most of yesterday choosing 15 potential jurors from a group of almost 90 candidates.  Lawyers then presented their opening arguments.  The prosecution said the 50-year-old Bucki hid evidence that he killed his wife Anita by cutting a piece of carpet, and then hiding her body in a wooded area.  The defense attorney said there's no proof which links Bucki to the death.  Investigators said he allegedly stabbed and choked his 48-year-old wife last April, and then dumped her remains in a swamp about 20 miles away in Taylor County.  Officials said Bucki was seeing another woman, and he stood to gain 150-thousand dollars in his wife's life insurance benefits.  Up to 80 witnesses could testify.  Seventy of them are on the prosecution's witness list.  The trial is scheduled to run through Thursday of next week.

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Wisconsin law enforcement leaders are praising seven new laws to fight growing heroin abuse.  Governor Scott Walker signed the measures yesterday.  All seven were drafted by Assembly Republican John Nygren of Marinette, whose daughter almost died from heroin.  Authorities say the new measures will help abusers get treatment.  They also believe it will raise public awareness of the dangers of heroin, instead of just throwing users in jail -- and burying those who die from overdoses.  Dodge County District Attorney Kurt Klomberg says there's a common perception that law enforcement has the "magic bullet" to keeping heroin addiction in check.  He says other ways are needed to help users get off the drug.  Among other things, the new laws will create funding for treatment facilities, allow first responders to give out the antidote Narcan, grant limited immunity for reporting heroin overdoses, and increasing sanctions for parole violators so they can get treatment sooner.  Those steps are all designed to put a dent into a problem that's been growing for almost a decade.  State officials said the percentage of drug deaths which involve heroin doubled from 2005-through-2010.

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A 24-year-old Illinois man will spend the rest of his life in prison for killing a Janesville area woman, while the two were in a vehicle on the Interstate.  Kody Walsh of Rockford was sentenced yesterday to 100 years in prison for homicide, plus 10 more years for aggravated restraint.  A jury in Rockford convicted Walsh just over a month ago.  He shot and killed 36-year-old Lori Daniels in September of 2012, while the two were riding in a vehicle on I-90 near South Beloit.  After the shooting, Walsh shot at the driver, stole the vehicle, and led police on a chase until the unit crashed.  He then ran off, and was captured in Tennessee a week later.  Walsh was sentenced to six years in prison for eluding police, to be served at the same time as his other sentences.

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A motorist was killed in Milwaukee from gunfire that was said to be aimed at a group of people on a street corner.  The victim was a 29-year-old woman.  She was shot just before five yesterday afternoon at a busy corner on Milwaukee's north side.  Police said an 18-year-old man was wounded in the shootings.  He was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.  Police are continuing to investigate, but they believe the woman was not involved with the shooters.  As of last evening, no suspects were in custody.

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