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He has more reasons to be skeptical of Kyoto claims

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TO THE EDITOR:

Here are the last five reasons why not to comply to the Kyoto treaty:

5. The arguments claiming man as a cause of global warming are based on computer programs that are incapable of modeling world climate: many of the millions of parameters can only be defined in ranges with arbitrary skewing. The predicted "hot spot" of CO2 induced global warming in the tropics troposphere is totally absent from the observational record.

6. Examination of weather disasters (floods, droughts, etc.) by scientists show no relevance to climate change.

7. Recognition of temperatures recorded by satellites and weather balloons show very minor temperature change in the last 50 years. As well, there is a bias in the geographical distribution of historical surface temperature measurements (so-called "urban heat islands"). It should be noted that the margin of error of temperature field observations is several times that of the average 0.6 degrees Celsius warming that has prevailed since the depth of the Little Ice Age around the year 1700 AD.

8. The Intergovernmental Panel (IPCC) with its Summary for Policymakers (SPM) is often quoted as an authoritative source on climate change. However, many climatologists, including scientists working on the IPCC, disagree strongly with some of the conclusions issued in the SPM. It is evident that the SPM information is often political in content. The widely distributed and referenced SPM was compiled by UN bureaucrats that fail to convey the uncertainty of climate change forecasts of the panel scientists.

9. The Kyoto Protocol, by focusing on attempts to curtail CO2 at incredible cost, will not stop or reverse climate change.

The lack of snow, or the disappearance of Furtwangler glacier on Mt. Kilimanjaro, are seen by global warming proponents as one of the many signs. In another letter, I'll address this.

Sanjeev Dhawan

Ellsworth

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