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Letter from Rep. Petryk: Assembly passes legislation to protect our children and grow small businesses

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Letter from Rep. Petryk: Assembly passes legislation to protect our children and grow small businesses
Ellsworth Wisconsin 126 S. Chestnut St. 54011

Assembly Passes Legislation to Protect our Children and Grow Small Businesses

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On Tuesday, the Wisconsin State Assembly met for the start of the fall 2013-14 session and passed multiple pieces of legislation. Two of the bills on the calendar focus on protecting our state’s children and helping our small businesses succeed in Wisconsin. 

Assembly Bill 248 will allow parents of dependents freeze their children’s credit. This will protect the child’s credit record and financial future. Most parents do not actively watch their child’s credit score. Unfortunately, this leads many parents to not be aware that their child’s identity may have been compromised. In our country, a child’s identity is thirty-five times more likely to have been stolen. One out of forty households has had a child become a victim of identity theft, and twenty-seven percent of those children who are victimized know the perpetrator. Most children and their parents do not even realize their identity has been stolen until they reach college.

This legislation will allow a parent to immediately freeze a child’s credit record which will not be accessible until the child reaches the age of 16. This freeze will prevent all credit reporting agencies from releasing their information until the time they reach 16 years of age. Wisconsin’s current law regarding this issue is reactionary, not preventative. After it is discovered that a child has had their identity stolen, a parent can then work to retroactively repair the damage done to their credit record. By this time, it is often a very complex and arduous process. 

Assembly Bill 248 is a necessary, common-sense bill that gained bi-partisan support. Now, the bill will move onto the state Senate where they will also likely work together to pass this legislation to protect our children. 

Also passed by the Assembly this week was Assembly Bill 350, also known as the CASE for Jobs bill. This legislation will create an innovative program to open the flow of small business capital. Assembly Bill 350 will help small business owners connect with local investors and help keep local dollars in Wisconsin.

Assembly Bill 350 helps eliminate government red tape and allow our local job creators to grow and prosper. This bill will help small businesses seek crowdfunding (the practice of funding a project by raising small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically by using the Internet) by sharing their business ideas and goals with a large, statewide, internet marketplace. The investor can obtain the information they require to determine their interest in investing.

Assembly Bill 350 is yet another integral part of the state Assembly’s continued commitment to encourage private sector job creation and to create a strong economic environment in which to do so. I am pleased that this bill also passed the Assembly with bi-partisan support and will move on to the state Senate for their consideration. 

 

Heroin Use Prevention Legislative Package Introduced

Last week, Representative Nygren (R-Marinette) and other legislators unveiled a legislative package to help combat the use and abuse of heroin in Wisconsin. I am fortunate to be a co-author of one of the bills that will help Wisconsin fight this growing issue. 

Representative Nygren and I, along with Senator Harsdorf, authored LRB 3112, the prescription ID bill. This bill requires any person picking up a Schedule II or III controlled substance (i.e. narcotic or opiate prescription medications) to present their picture ID to the pharmacy staff. Acceptable forms of identification include a state issued driver’s license, state identification card, a U.S. uniformed service card, or a U.S. passport. 

This bill would not keep one individual from picking up medication for another individual. The legislation will require that anyone picking up a Schedule II or III controlled substance show their identification and that information will be tracked. The information will then be reported to the Department of Safety and Professional Services who runs the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. This program is a tool used to improve patient care and safety by reducing abuse and diversion of prescription drugs. Currently, pharmacies and practioners submit information to the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program regarding the dispensing of prescription medications that are monitored by the program. 

 

Representative Nygren and others also introduced the following bills as part of his heroin use prevention package: 

  • Administering Naloxone (LRB 3112):  Narcan or Naloxone is a drug used to counter the effects of opiate overdose, such as heroin overdose. Under current law, basic EMTs are not allowed to carry Narcan. This legislation will allow all levels of EMT and first responders to be trained to administer Naloxone. This legislation will also include police and fire but use permissive language, leaving the decision up to the individual community to decide whether to allow other public safety officers the ability to administer the drug.

  • Drug Disposal Program (LRB-3348):  This bill will update state criminal law and state regulatory provisions concerning prescription drugs and controlled substances in order to facilitate and encourage the operation of community drug disposal programs and other similar programs throughout Wisconsin.

  • 911 Overdose Good Samaritan (LRB 3164):  The bill will provide limited immunity from certain criminal prosecutions for a person (aider) who brings another person to an emergency room or other healthcare facility or who calls 911 for a person who is having an adverse reaction (overdose) from the controlled substance. The aider, or person who called 911, may not be prosecuted for simple possession of a controlled substance under the circumstances that led him or her to call 911.

     

 

Upcoming Events in the 93rd Assembly District

Durand Rod and Gun Club Chicken Dinners October 17th November 7th Reservations required:

Greater Insurance Service of Durand (715) 672-5921 Mondovi Insurance-Mondovi (715)926-3341

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