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Packers clobber Cardinals 33-7, will play them again next weekend

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GLENDALE, Arz. - Packers' coach Mike McCarthy played his starters for most of Green Bay's 33-to-7 win at Arizona to go into the playoffs with momentum. Cardinals' coach Ken Whisenhunt played many of his starters a quarter or less to avoid injuries.

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But Cardinals' receiver Anquan Boldin left with a sprained knee, and corner Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie left early with a bruised knee. Both have not been ruled out of next week's Wild Card game. For the Packers, corner Charles Woodson left before halftime, after he aggravated a sprained shoulder he's had since November. McCarthy says Woodson will most likely play next week.

The Packer defense rushed four players most of the day, saving their best stuff for next week. But they managed to get three interceptions and a fumble recovery, and Green Bay finished with the NFL's top turnover margin at plus-24 for the regular season.

Woodson ran an interception back 45 yards for a touchdown. Quarterback Aaron Rodgers set a new Packer record with his 12th game without an interception, breaking Bart Starr's season mark of 11 in 1964. Rodgers went 21-of-26 yesterday for 235 yards, a touchdown pass, and a scoring run. He ended the season with 44-hundred-34 passing yards - just 24 yards short of Lynn Dickey's team record from 1983. The Packers out-gained the Cards 345 yards to 187. Ryan Grant had 51 yards and a TD, and Ahman Green ran for 42 yards. Donald Driver was the Pack's top receiver with six catches for 65 yards.

The Cardinals scored their lone touchdown with 2:59 left when third-stringer Brian Saint Pierre tossed a three-yarder to Larry Fitzgerald. Kurt Warner started, and Matt Leinart completed 13-of-21 passes for 96 yards and two picks.

A win next Sunday would send the Packers to either top-seeded New Orleans or number-two Minnesota, depending on how third-seeded Dallas does against number-six Philadelphia next Saturday night.

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