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WISCONSIN NEWS BRIEFS: Protesters arrested for third straight day at state capitol

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news Ellsworth, 54011

Ellsworth Wisconsin 126 S. Chestnut St. 54011

MADISON - It was another round of protesters arrested at the State Capitol Building rotunda yesterday.

Police arrested 17 people with an additional 14 citations based on video. Since Wednesday, 82 tickets have been issued to protesters for not having a permit to gather at the Capitol. Protesters argue that their constitutional rights allow them to gather without a permit.

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A Wisconsin woman has been sentenced in an alleged starvation and reckless endangerment case. The unidentified Madison woman will serve five years for allegedly locking up their teenage daughter in a basement and denying her food. Prosecutors called the family home a “house of terror”. Court records show the teen, who is now 16, dropped to 68 pounds while going through the ordeal. The victim’s father was convicted of child neglect in March and faces other charges in November. The teen’s step brother is also facing charges, including sexual assault – his trial is in February.

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Wisconsin’s Chippewa tribes have finished a federal trial on whether or not they can hunt deer at night. The Department of Natural Resources have banned night hunting in the state amid safety concerns. The tribe says they should be allowed to hunt at night because of DNR’s allowed wolves and disease containment night hunts. There was no ruling in the case, but attorneys have until mid-September to submit final briefs.  

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U.S. Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack is calling for Congress to enact immigration reform, saying the agriculture industry would suffer if something is not done. According to a 2006 report, 77-percent of all ag. workers in the U.S. were born in another country. Vilsack says another study shows Georgia farmers were 40-percent short on field hands needed to harvest crops in 2012, after tough immigration hiring laws were enacted there. Vilsack adds that could trickle down to other states, including Wisconsin. Immigration reform is currently in the works. The U-S Senate have cleared a plan to grant legal resident status to current farm workers who entered the country illegally.

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The Humane Society in Milwaukee says they have received enough donations to pay for a little rescue puppy’s medical expenses. The 3-month old puppy, named Bella, was brought to the Humane Society after a child accidentally dropped Bella. Veterinarians were forced to amputate the pup’s front leg. A spokesperson for the Humane Society in Milwaukee says they've raised the 25-hundred dollar to cover those costs, thanks to the donation from across the state. Bella will be up for adoption by next week. More information is available at www-DOT-WIHUMANE-DOT-org.

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Wisconsin will get $11-million dollars to help child care centers improve their standing in the state’s five-star rating system. Governor Scott Walker announced a new education grant today as a part of President Obama’s “Race to the Top” initiative. It’s designed to encourage innovative ways for states to improve early childhood education. The Republican Walker said the state Department of Children-and-Families would administer the new funding – and it will be focused on the state’s two-year-old “Young-Star” rating system for child care centers. Walker said the money would help centers achieve higher ratings through quote, “additional training, mentoring, and on-site coaching to develop innovations which improve family engagement in the early education of their children.” Child care advocates are concerned because the state gave a meager-looking two stars to about two-thirds of the state’s 46-hundred child care centers. A recent Wisconsin State Journal report said hundreds of day care workers are going to college for the first time, to try and get their centers rated higher.

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A Byzantine Rite Catholic priest who was expelled for allegedly molesting young boys in New Jersey has moved to Manitowoc. Parishioners in the Catholic Eparchy of Passaic New Jersey have been told that 49-year-old Glenn Davidowich was removed from the clergy in early April. The AP cites property records showing that Davidowich lives in eastern Wisconsin. He was first put on leave in 2011, after reaching a $200,000 settlement with a man who claimed he was abused as a child. The Newark Star-Ledger said a second similar lawsuit was settled in June. Davidowich was never criminally charged. 

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The father of a six-year-old girl killed in the Newtown, Connecticut school shootings has been urging Americans to find peace in the aftermath of the tragedy. Robbie Parker will bring that message to Oak Creek next weekend. He’ll speak next Saturday before a running event that commemorates the first anniversary of the Sikh Temple shooting massacre. Parker was invited to speak by Pardeep Kaleka, whose father was among the six worshippers killed last August fifth at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek. Parker told reporters the day after the school shootings that he was not mad – and he felt sympathy for the gunman’s family. Since then, Parker has talked with several groups. He says it has allowed him to deal with his own grief, while helping others deal with theirs.

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Parts of the Midwest are starting to get drought conditions again – but not Wisconsin. The U.S. Drought Monitor says 19-percent of the land area is abnormally dry in nine Midwest states. Almost two thirds of neighboring Iowa is dry, along with about 60-percent of Missouri. The drought maps of Wisconsin and Michigan are totally blank, along with Ohio and Kentucky. About 14-percent of Minnesota is dry, with almost two-percent in a moderate drought. Wisconsin’s massive drought of 2012 hung on until late June, when areas in the western half of the state had flooding. Much of the state ended nearly a month-long dry spell this week with sizable rains. Scattered thunderstorms were going through Wisconsin this morning. They’re expected to clear out tonight after a cold front goes through. Dense morning fog along Lake Superior ended sooner than expected this morning. We’re expected to get dry and much cooler weather for the weekend, with highs well below normal in the 60’s each day.

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A Fond du Lac County man has been sentenced to six years in prison for tying a teenager to a porch rafter, and having his pit bull attack the youngster. 59-year-old Richard Lisko was also told to spend six years under extended supervision, for convictions of false imprisonment and reckless injury. The prison time was about half of what prosecutors recommended. Authorities said Lisko was upset at 18-year-old Joel Kennedy of New Berlin for stealing morphine and gold coins from his house in Campbellsport. So Lisko tied up the teenager, and his pit bull “Bubba” attack Kennedy on-and-off for over an hour. The dog bit the teen’s face. The animal has been at a humane shelter since Lisko was arrested last fall.

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Hundreds of people ran out of the Milwaukee County Courthouse yesterday, after a painter accidentally set off a fire alarm. The courthouse had just fully re-opened on Wednesday, after an electrical fire on July sixth closed the building. A spokesman for County Executive Chris Abele mentioned a silver lining in today’s false alarm. Brendan Conway said it showed that the building’s evacuation procedures are working smoothly. Crews are still replacing ceiling tiles and carpeting which had smoke damage from the fire. Most employees are back in their offices by now. The cause of the electrical fire remains under investigation. 

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A Milwaukee man will spend five years in prison for killing a passenger and injuring another while driving drunk. 25-year-old Christopher Allen must also spend four years under extended supervision once he’s no longer behind bars. Prosecutors said Allen drove his car into a tree in February. Aaron Calvin was killed, and another passenger survived injuries that included a broken hip. Allen’s blood alcohol level was point-12, about one-and-a-half times the legal limit. He pleaded no contest earlier to felony charges of causing death and injury by drunk driving. Three other counts were dropped in a plea bargain. 

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Cable TV viewers in southeast Wisconsin have had to dig out their old rabbit ears to get Milwaukee’s NBC station. Time Warner Cable cut off Channel-Four, WTMJ, after the two reached a stalemate over the rights’ fees the station should pay to be on the cable system. Time Warner claims that WTMJ wants to triple its rights’ fees. The station says the increase would be only pennies a day. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, which owns Channel-Four, quoted an industry analyst as saying the current proposal would increase the rights’ fees by up to 18-cents per customer each month over the next three years. WTMJ went dark at 12:01 a.m. yesterday on Time Warner. The Journal Sentinel said the station lost 38,000 viewers during its six-and-ten-o’clock newscasts last night.   

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